Working for Female Managers: Gender Hierarchy in the Workplace

55 Pages Posted: 30 Jan 2010 Last revised: 14 Jun 2011

See all articles by Illoong Kwon

Illoong Kwon

Seoul National University

Eva M. Meyersson Milgrom

Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR); Stanford University - Department of Sociology

Date Written: March 12, 2010

Abstract

We study workers’ reactions to changes in the gender composition of top management during a merger or acquisition, finding that an increase in the number of female top managers within their occupation makes male workers more likely to quit, and female workers less likely to quit. These effects vary across occupations, depending on the female share, and male workers’ aversion to female managers is strongest when the female share nears fifty percent. The effects also vary over time and with age, becoming smaller in more recent years and among younger males, but increase with education level. We find little evidence that these preferences are driven by pecuniary effects.

Keywords: Gender Diversity, Gender Quota, Similarity Attraction

JEL Classification: J16, J63, J78

Suggested Citation

Kwon, Illoong and Meyersson Milgrom, Eva, Working for Female Managers: Gender Hierarchy in the Workplace (March 12, 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1544549 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1544549

Illoong Kwon (Contact Author)

Seoul National University ( email )

Graduate School of Public Administration
599 Gwanak-ro
Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)
82-2-880-8551 (Phone)
82-2-877-2411 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.albany.edu/~ik325357/

Eva Meyersson Milgrom

Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) ( email )

579 Serra Mall at Galvez St.
Stanford, CA 94305-6015
United States

Stanford University - Department of Sociology ( email )

Stanford, CA 94305
United States

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