Urban Growth Drivers and Spatial Inequalities: Europe – A Case with Geographically Sticky People

42 Pages Posted: 12 Feb 2010

See all articles by Paul C. Cheshire

Paul C. Cheshire

London School of Economics & Political Science

Stefano Magrini

Ca Foscari University of Venice - Dipartimento di Economia

Date Written: October 1, 2009

Abstract

Analysts of regional growth differences in the US tend to assume full spatial equilibrium (Glaeser et al, 1995). Flows of people thus indicate changes in the distribution of spatial welfare more effectively than differences in incomes. Research in Europe, however, shows that people tend to be immobile. Even mobility within countries is restricted compared to the US but national boundaries offer particular barriers to spatial adjustment. Thus it is less reasonable to assume full spatial equilibrium in a European context and differences in per capita incomes may persist and signal real spatial welfare differences. Furthermore, it implies that the drivers of what population movement there is, may differ from the drivers of spatial differences in productivity or output growth. This paper analyses the drivers of differential urban growth in the EU both in terms of population and output growth. The results show significant differences in the drivers as well as common ones. They also reveal the extent to which national borders still impede spatial adjustment in Europe. This has important implications for policy and may apply more generally to countries – for example China – less homogeneous than the USA.

JEL Classification: Z00

Suggested Citation

Cheshire, Paul and Magrini, Stefano, Urban Growth Drivers and Spatial Inequalities: Europe – A Case with Geographically Sticky People (October 1, 2009). LEQS Paper No. 11, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1550915 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1550915

Paul Cheshire (Contact Author)

London School of Economics & Political Science ( email )

Houghton Street
London, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

Stefano Magrini

Ca Foscari University of Venice - Dipartimento di Economia ( email )

Cannaregio 873
Venice, 30121
Italy

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
49
Abstract Views
540
PlumX Metrics