Does Response Evaluation and Decision (RED) Mediate the Relation between Hostile Attributional Style and Antisocial Behavior in Adolescence?

34 Pages Posted: 11 Feb 2010

See all articles by Reid Griffith Fontaine

Reid Griffith Fontaine

Duke University

Marieh Tanha

University of Arizona

Chongming Yang

Duke University

Kenneth Dodge

Duke University - Sanford School of Public Policy

John E. Bates

Indiana University

Gregory S. Pettit

Auburn University

Date Written: February 10, 2010

Abstract

The role of hostile attributional style (HAS) in antisocial development has been well-documented. We analyzed longitudinal data on 585 youths (48% female; 19% ethnic minority) to test the hypothesis that response evaluation and decision (RED) mediates the relation between HAS and antisocial behavior in adolescence. In Grades 10 and 12, adolescent participants and their parents reported participants’ antisocial conduct. In Grade 11, participants were asked to imagine themselves in videotaped ambiguous-provocation scenarios. Segment 1 of each scenario presented an ambiguous provocation, after which participants answered HAS questions. In segment 2, participants were asked to imagine themselves responding aggressively to the provocateur, after which RED was assessed. Structural equation modeling indicated that RED mediates the relation between HAS and subsequent antisocial conduct, controlling for previous misconduct. Findings are consistent with research on the development of executive function processes in adolescence, and suggest that the relation between HAS and RED changes after childhood.

Suggested Citation

Fontaine, Reid Griffith and Tanha, Marieh and Yang, Chongming and Dodge, Kenneth and Bates, John E. and Pettit, Gregory S., Does Response Evaluation and Decision (RED) Mediate the Relation between Hostile Attributional Style and Antisocial Behavior in Adolescence? (February 10, 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1550975 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1550975

Reid Griffith Fontaine (Contact Author)

Duke University ( email )

United States

Marieh Tanha

University of Arizona

Department of History
Tucson, AZ 85721
United States

Chongming Yang

Duke University ( email )

100 Fuqua Drive
Durham, NC 27708-0204
United States

Kenneth Dodge

Duke University - Sanford School of Public Policy ( email )

201 Science Drive
Box 90312
Durham, NC 27708-0239
United States

John E. Bates

Indiana University

107 S Indiana Ave
100 South Woodlawn
Bloomington, IN 47405
United States

Gregory S. Pettit

Auburn University

415 West Magnolia Avenue
Auburn, AL 36849
United States

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