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Neuropsychological and Early Environmental Correlates of Sex Differences in Crime

International Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 23, pp. 199-214, 1984

15 Pages Posted: 21 Feb 2010  

Deborah W. Denno

Fordham University School of Law

Date Written: 1984

Abstract

Results of recent research suggest that longitudinal influences on sex differences in verbal and spatial abilities, and delinquent behavior, may be similar. The present study examined biological, environmental, and psychological variables collected from birth through age 17 on a sample of subjects who participated in the Philadelphia Collaborative Perinatal Project (CPP). Findings supported in part past research suggesting that environmental relationships with intellectual ability and delinquency are strongest for males, whereas biological relationships are somewhat more important for females. Socioeconomic factors were among the strongest predictors of delinquency for both sexes, however. In turn, biological and environmental influences on verbal and spatial abilities and their relationships with later achievement were different between the sexes. Results are discussed in terms of possible sex differences in the development of the left and right cerebral hemispheres, as well as in the vulnerability to environmental influences.

Suggested Citation

Denno, Deborah W., Neuropsychological and Early Environmental Correlates of Sex Differences in Crime (1984). International Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 23, pp. 199-214, 1984. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1555915

Deborah W. Denno (Contact Author)

Fordham University School of Law ( email )

Fordham University School of Law
150 West 62nd Street
New York, NY 10023
United States
212-636-6868 (Phone)
212-636-6899 (Fax)

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