Labor Market Frictions as a Source of Comparative Advantage, with Implications for Unemployment and Inequality

20 Pages Posted: 22 Feb 2010 Last revised: 30 Jul 2010

See all articles by Elhanan Helpman

Elhanan Helpman

Harvard University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: February 2010

Abstract

Recent research has emphasized firm heterogeneity as a source of comparative advantage. Combining this approach with labor market frictions and worker heterogeneity provides a framework for studying the impact of trade on unemployment and inequality. This paper reviews this approach and reports a number of results from recent studies.

Suggested Citation

Helpman, Elhanan, Labor Market Frictions as a Source of Comparative Advantage, with Implications for Unemployment and Inequality (February 2010). NBER Working Paper No. w15764. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1556128

Elhanan Helpman (Contact Author)

Harvard University - Department of Economics ( email )

Littauer Center
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
617-495-4690 (Phone)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
31
Abstract Views
420
PlumX Metrics