Changing Consequences of Job Separation in the United States

Posted: 8 Jul 1999

See all articles by Daniel Polsky

Daniel Polsky

Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins University; Johns Hopkins University - Carey Business School

Abstract

Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, the author examines the consequences of job loss between the periods 1976-81 and 1986-91. He finds stability in the overall incidence of job separation, but a statistically significant increase in the incidence of involuntary job loss, relative to quits, for older workers. He also finds that the consequences of involuntary job loss worsened: the reemployment rate of workers who experienced involuntary job loss dropped from 67% in 1976-81 to 62% in 1986-91, and among those who found new jobs, the odds of receiving a wage at least equal to that in the old job declined.

JEL Classification: J23

Suggested Citation

Polsky, Daniel, Changing Consequences of Job Separation in the United States. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, July 1999. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=156349

Daniel Polsky (Contact Author)

Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins University ( email )

624 North Broadway
Baltimore, MD 21205
United States

Johns Hopkins University - Carey Business School ( email )

100 International Drive
Baltimore, MD 21202
United States

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