Externships and New Lawyer Mentoring: The Practicing Lawyer's Role in Educating New Lawyers

Brigham Young University Journal of Public Law, Vol. 24, p. 101, 2010

52 Pages Posted: 17 Mar 2010

See all articles by James Backman

James Backman

Brigham Young University - J. Reuben Clark Law School

Date Written: 2010

Abstract

Law schools and bar associations have begun successful and sustainable programs to assist law students and new lawyers in making the transition from law school to the first year of legal practice. The key to the universal availability of these proven approaches is the willingness of experienced lawyers to become supervising mentors for law school externship programs and for bar association mentoring programs for new lawyers. The traditional roadblocks to implementation of these programs have disappeared by eliminating the heavy costs involved in traditional law school clinical programs and by adding quality controls to bar association programs to assure that the formerly debunked apprenticeship programs operate as they should. Law schools can contribute to a meaningful transition by providing meaningful practice experiences as the method for learning in a capstone apprenticeship semester during the third year of law school. Bar associations can adopt learning oriented plans for mentors to turn a relationship into a meaningful set of educational objectives.

Keywords: externships, apprenticeship, mentoring, clinical, mentors

Suggested Citation

Backman, James, Externships and New Lawyer Mentoring: The Practicing Lawyer's Role in Educating New Lawyers (2010). Brigham Young University Journal of Public Law, Vol. 24, p. 101, 2010. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1569593

James Backman (Contact Author)

Brigham Young University - J. Reuben Clark Law School ( email )

430 JRCB
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602
United States

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