Economic Openness and Subjective Well-Being in China

19 Pages Posted: 22 Mar 2010

See all articles by Wen Xin

Wen Xin

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Russell Smyth

Monash University - Department of Economics

Abstract

Using a large household survey administered across 30 cities in September 2003, we examine the relationship between the degree of economic openness, measured as the sum of imports and exports as a share of GDP, and subjective well-being in urban China. We find that respondents who live in cities with high levels of economic openness report significantly lower levels of subjective well-being ceteris paribus. We offer four explanations for this result; namely, inadequate social protection in the face of globalization, unfulfilled expectations, political dissatisfaction and anomie.

Suggested Citation

xin, wen and Smyth, Russell, Economic Openness and Subjective Well-Being in China. China & World Economy, Vol. 18, No. 2, pp. 22-40, April 2010, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1571780 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-124X.2010.01187.x

Wen Xin (Contact Author)

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

Russell Smyth

Monash University - Department of Economics ( email )

Wellington Road
Clayton, Victoria 3
Australia

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
3
Abstract Views
475
PlumX Metrics