Should Congress Pass the Employee Free Choice Act? Some Neighborly Advice

Just Labour: A Canadian Journal of Work and Society, Vol. 15, p. 116, 2009

5 Pages Posted: 1 Apr 2010  

John Godard

University of Manitoba - Department of Business Administration

Joseph B. Rose

McMaster University - DeGroote School of Business

Sara Slinn

York University - Osgoode Hall Law School

Date Written: March 29, 2010

Abstract

American labour law is broken. As many as 60 percent of American workers would like to have a union, yet only 12 percent actually do. This is largely due to systematic employer interference, often in violation of existing laws. The Employee Free Choice Act (EFCA), currently before Congress, contains provisions to rectify this problem. Canada's experience with similar provisions can be helpful in evaluating the arguments surrounding this act. It suggests that the reforms proposed in EFCA can be expected to safeguard rather than deny employees' free choices. They will not alter the balance of power in collective bargaining, but only help to ensure that workers can exercise their basic right to meaningful representation at work and, potentially, to win gains that could help to reduce inequality and return America to prosperity.

Keywords: EFCA, Employee Free Choice Act, NLRB, National Labor Relations Board, collective bargaining, Wagner Act, Canada, labor law

JEL Classification: K31, K21, N30, J50, J51, J52, J58

Suggested Citation

Godard, John and Rose, Joseph B. and Slinn, Sara, Should Congress Pass the Employee Free Choice Act? Some Neighborly Advice (March 29, 2010). Just Labour: A Canadian Journal of Work and Society, Vol. 15, p. 116, 2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1580265

John Godard

University of Manitoba - Department of Business Administration ( email )

Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 5V4
Canada
204-474-8433 (Phone)
204-275-0181 (Fax)

Joseph B. Rose

McMaster University - DeGroote School of Business ( email )

1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M4
Canada

Sara Slinn (Contact Author)

York University - Osgoode Hall Law School ( email )

4700 Keele Street
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
(416) 736-5052 (Phone)

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