The Diversity Paradox

Posted: 29 Mar 2010  

Justin Hackett

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Michael A. Hogg

Claremont Colleges - Claremont Graduate University

Abstract

Many societies place value on diversity. The logic is that if people value living in communities that are diverse with respect to race, ethnicity, culture, religion, social values, socioeconomic status, and attitudes they will become tolerant and accepting of human differences. There is however a potential anomaly here - a diversity paradox. The psychology of groups has shown that groups accentuate and value intragroup similarity and intergroup difference. Two experiments examined the influence of this paradox on community identification. We found, subjective importance of diversity predicted increased identification when people were uncertain and believed the community was attitudinally homogeneous (motivated to identify because attitudinal homogeneity cued a sense of being included with and accepted by like-minded others), and when people were certain and believed the community was attitudinally diverse (identified more when attitudinal diversity indicated consistency between valuing diversity and being in a group that was genuinely diverse). Additionally, the importance of diversity predicted increased identification when people felt value similarity within the community was important. An intriguing paradox emerges - those who believe it is important to live in an ideologically diverse community identify with the community more when it is important that other community members all cherish similar values.

Suggested Citation

Hackett, Justin and Hogg, Michael A., The Diversity Paradox. Western Political Science Association 2010 Annual Meeting Paper . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1581021

Justin Hackett (Contact Author)

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Michael A. Hogg

Claremont Colleges - Claremont Graduate University ( email )

150 E. Tenth Street
Claremont, CA 91711
United States

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