The Effect of Daughters on Partisanship

15 Pages Posted: 5 Apr 2010

See all articles by Dalton Conley

Dalton Conley

New York University (NYU) - Department of Sociology; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Emily Rauscher

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: April 2010

Abstract

Washington (2008) finds that, controlling for total number of children, each additional daughter makes a member of Congress more likely to vote liberally and attributes this finding to socialization. However, daughters' influence could manifest differently for elite politicians and the general citizenry, thanks to the selection gradient particular to the political process. This study asks whether the proportion of female biological offspring affects political party identification. Using nationally-representative data from the General Social Survey, we find that female offspring induce more conservative political identification. We hypothesize that this results from the change in reproductive fitness strategy that daughters may evince.

Suggested Citation

Conley, Dalton and Rauscher, Emily, The Effect of Daughters on Partisanship (April 2010). NBER Working Paper No. w15873, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1583814

Dalton Conley (Contact Author)

New York University (NYU) - Department of Sociology ( email )

New York, NY 10012
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Emily Rauscher

affiliation not provided to SSRN

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