‘Lawyers and Loyalty,’ Essay Review of Peter Irons, Justice at War: The Story of the Japanese American Internment Cases

Reviews in American History, Vol. 12, p. 575, 1984

14 Pages Posted: 14 Apr 2010

See all articles by Aviam Soifer

Aviam Soifer

University of Hawaii at Manoa - William S. Richardson School of Law

Date Written: December 1, 1984

Abstract

A powerful literature already underscores the absence of justification for the federal government's decision to intern some 120,000 Japanese Americans in desolate camps for nearly all of World War II. The racism, jingoism, and economic and political interests behind this vast human tragedy are now clear.1 Yet how such a gross miscalculation of ends and means produced this continuing blot on the national conscience is still controversial.

Suggested Citation

Soifer, Aviam, ‘Lawyers and Loyalty,’ Essay Review of Peter Irons, Justice at War: The Story of the Japanese American Internment Cases (December 1, 1984). Reviews in American History, Vol. 12, p. 575, 1984. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1589778

Aviam Soifer (Contact Author)

University of Hawaii at Manoa - William S. Richardson School of Law ( email )

2515 Dole St.
Honolulu, HI 96822-2350
United States

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