RepRap: The Replicating Rapid Prototyper: Maximizing Customizability by Breeding the Means of Production

HANDBOOK OF RESEARCH IN MASS CUSTOMIZATION AND PERSONALIZATION, Forthcoming

Posted: 20 May 2010 Last revised: 24 May 2010

See all articles by Ed Sells

Ed Sells

University of Bath-Mechanical Engineering Department

Zach Smith

RepRap Research Foundation

Sebastien Bailard

Supermeta Fabrication

Adrian Bowyer

University of Bath - Department of Mechanical Engineering

Vik Olliver

Diamond Age Solutions; Catalyst IT Ltd.

Abstract

This paper describes progress on RepRap, the replicating rapid prototyper. RepRap is a filament-deposition rapid prototying machine that has been designed to manufacture the majority of its own parts. All other parts of the machine are standard materials and components available everywhere in the world. RepRap is intended to maximize the customizability of both the products that it makes and also itself. It achieves this by several complementary mechanisms: it is intended for individual (as well as industrial) use, so its users may employ it to manufacture whatever they want; it can make copies of itself, and those copies can be customized; it is extremely low cost, and so ownership can be widespread; and finally it is open-source, so all its designs and software are available for modification. Prototype RepRap machines have been built and are described. These have made parts for themselves and each other, and this is depicted. The design principles and specifications of the machine are given. The paper concludes with a discussion of the possible impacts that the machine may have on personal manufacturing and product customization.

Keywords: Mass Customization, Personalization, Engineer-to-Order, Open Innovation, User Co-Creation, Modularity, Platform Design, Customer Centricity

Suggested Citation

Sells, Ed and Smith, Zach and Bailard, Sebastien and Bowyer, Adrian and Olliver, Vik, RepRap: The Replicating Rapid Prototyper: Maximizing Customizability by Breeding the Means of Production. HANDBOOK OF RESEARCH IN MASS CUSTOMIZATION AND PERSONALIZATION, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1594475

Ed Sells

University of Bath-Mechanical Engineering Department ( email )

Claverton Down
Bath, BA2 7AY
United Kingdom

Zach Smith

RepRap Research Foundation ( email )

111 E 14th St
PMB #166
New York, NY 10003
United States

Sebastien Bailard

Supermeta Fabrication ( email )

15 Clarey Ave
Ottawa, Ontario K1S 2R6
Canada

Adrian Bowyer (Contact Author)

University of Bath - Department of Mechanical Engineering ( email )

Claverton Down
Bath, BA2 7AY
United Kingdom

Vik Olliver

Diamond Age Solutions ( email )

72 Warner Park Ave.
Laingholm
Waitakere, North Island 0604
New Zealand
+649 9 817 7138 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://diamondage.co.nz

Catalyst IT Ltd. ( email )

Level 6, 150-154 Willis Street,
PO Box 11-053, Manners St.
Wellington 6142
New Zealand

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