How Dramatically Did Women's Suffrage Change the Size and Scope of Government?

Journal of Political Economy, 1999, Vol. 107, no. 6, pt.1, pp. 1163-1198

36 Pages Posted: 15 Apr 1999 Last revised: 2 Jul 2021

See all articles by John R. Lott

John R. Lott

Crime Prevention Research Center

Date Written: September 1, 1998

Abstract

This paper examines the growth of government during this century as a result of giving women the right to vote. Using cross-sectional time-series data for 1870 to 1940, we examine state government expenditures and revenue as well as voting by U.S. House and Senate state delegations and the passage of a wide range of different state laws. Suffrage coincided with immediate increases in state government expenditures and revenue and more liberal voting patterns for federal representatives, and these effects continued growing over time as more women took advantage of the franchise. Contrary to many recent suggestions, the gender gap is not something that has arisen since the 1970s, and it helps explain why American government started growing when it did.

Journal of Political Economy, 1999, Vol. 107, no. 6, pt.1, pp. 1163-1198

Suggested Citation

Lott, John R., How Dramatically Did Women's Suffrage Change the Size and Scope of Government? (September 1, 1998). Journal of Political Economy, 1999, Vol. 107, no. 6, pt.1, pp. 1163-1198, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=160530 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.160530

John R. Lott (Contact Author)

Crime Prevention Research Center ( email )

PO Box 2293
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Missoula, MT 59801
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