Teaching 'Indigenous Peoples and the Law' - Whose Law?

Alternative Law Journal, Vol 33, No. 3, pp. 132-136, 2008

5 Pages Posted: 14 May 2010

See all articles by Kirsten Anker

Kirsten Anker

McGill University - Faculty of Law

Date Written: May 30, 2008

Abstract

Law faculty courses on indigenous legal issues tend to assume that "the law" to be studied is the law of court cases and statutes. If indigenous law comes into the picture, it is frequently only in relation to establishing claims within state law, or critiquing the sufficiency of policy, legislation and judicial decisions. Using the unique transsystemic approach to legal education championed by McGill University Faculty of Law as a starting point, this article explores what it might mean to take indigenous law seriously in the law curriculum.

Keywords: Indigenous Law, Legal Education, Mcgill, Native Title, Transsystemic

Suggested Citation

Anker, Kirsten, Teaching 'Indigenous Peoples and the Law' - Whose Law? (May 30, 2008). Alternative Law Journal, Vol 33, No. 3, pp. 132-136, 2008, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1606973

Kirsten Anker (Contact Author)

McGill University - Faculty of Law ( email )

3644 Peel Street
Montreal H3A 1W9, Quebec
Canada

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