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The Downside of Organizational Identification: Collective Shame and Turnover During Organizational Mistakes

36 Pages Posted: 25 May 2010  

Shu-Cheng Chi

National Taiwan University - College of Management

Ray Friedman

Vanderbilt University - Organizational Behavior

Hsin-hsin Lo

Ching Yun University

Abstract

This study examined the extent to which employees experience collective shame and guilt for the wrongful acts by their companies, and the potential effects of these emotions on turnover intention and organizational citizenship behaviors. The study context was a real industry-wide PR crisis in Taiwan's fast food industry in 2009. Our data found that employees who made internal attributions for the company's bad actions were more likely to feel collective shame and collective guilt. For those with a high organizational identification, the relationship between internal attribution and collective shame was especially strong. Furthermore, collective shame led to higher turnover intentions, especially for those with a high interdependent self. Thus, organizational identification may have negative effects for organizations during times of organizational wrong-doing.

Suggested Citation

Chi, Shu-Cheng and Friedman, Ray and Lo, Hsin-hsin, The Downside of Organizational Identification: Collective Shame and Turnover During Organizational Mistakes. IACM 23rd Annual Conference Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1612367 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1612367

Shu-Cheng Chi (Contact Author)

National Taiwan University - College of Management ( email )

No. 1, Section 4
Roosevelt Road
Taipei 106
Taiwan

Raymond A. Friedman

Vanderbilt University - Organizational Behavior ( email )

401 21st Avenue South
Nashville, TN 37203
United States
615-322-3992 (Phone)
615-343-7177 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://mba.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/rfriedman.cfm

Hsin-hsin Lo

Ching Yun University ( email )

229 Chien-Hsin Rd.
Taiwan, 320
China

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