East Asians' Social Heterogeneity: Differences in Norms Among Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Negotiators

Negotiation Journal, Forthcoming 2012

33 Pages Posted: 21 May 2010 Last revised: 19 Jul 2012

Date Written: July 17, 2012

Abstract

This paper shows that the assumption, widely accepted in the culture and negotiation literature, that East Asian cultures are homogeneous in their value for preserving social relationships is an oversimplification. We propose that there will be differences in negotiation norms among managers from China, Japan, and Korea because the focus of social relations – individual versus group – and the emotional versus instrumental nature of those relations varies systematically among these three cultures. Web survey data from managers from the three countries showed, as predicted, that Japanese managers were most likely to endorse distributive tactic norms; Chinese managers were least likely to endorse integrative tactic norms; and Korean managers were most likely to endorse norms for self-interest.

Suggested Citation

Lee, Sujin and Brett, Jeanne M. and Park, Ji Hyearn, East Asians' Social Heterogeneity: Differences in Norms Among Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Negotiators (July 17, 2012). Negotiation Journal, Forthcoming 2012. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1612543 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1612543

Sujin Lee (Contact Author)

KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) ( email )

373-1 Kusong-dong
Yuson-gu
Daejeon 305-701
Korea

Jeanne M. Brett

Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management ( email )

2001 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States
847-491-8075 (Phone)
847-491-8896 (Fax)

Ji Hyearn Park

Harvard University ( email )

1875 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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