The Prison in Economics: Private and Public Incarceration in Ancient Greece

22 Pages Posted: 27 May 2010

See all articles by Daniel Joseph D'Amico

Daniel Joseph D'Amico

Loyola University New Orleans - Joseph A. Butt S.J. College of Business - Economics Department

Date Written: November 17, 2009

Abstract

Recent histories of Ancient Greece describe a transition from customary law to public criminal justice between 800 and 400 B.C. This narrative contains three pieces of evidence against the presumption that prisons are a public good and government must provide incarcerations. First, before the rise of a formal government, Ancient Greece had a functioning system of criminal law enforcement. Second, the timeline surrounding the rise of government institutions in Ancient Greece originated with Solon's penal reforms. Lastly, the rise of a government system was more the rise of private rather than public interest.

Keywords: Public Goods, Market Failure, Prisons, Athens, Economic History

JEL Classification: N4, N0, P5

Suggested Citation

D'Amico, Daniel Joseph, The Prison in Economics: Private and Public Incarceration in Ancient Greece (November 17, 2009). Public Choice, Forthcoming, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1616723

Daniel Joseph D'Amico (Contact Author)

Loyola University New Orleans - Joseph A. Butt S.J. College of Business - Economics Department ( email )

6363 St. Charles Ave
Box 015
New Orleans, LA 70118
United States
561-870-5941 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.danieljdamico.com

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