Justice in Her Own Right: Bertha Wilson and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

REFLECTIONS ON THE LEGACY OF JUSTICE BERTHA WILSON, pp. 371-405, LexisNexis Canada, 2008

38 Pages Posted: 1 Jun 2010

See all articles by Jamie Cameron

Jamie Cameron

York University - Osgoode Hall Law School

Date Written: 2008

Abstract

Upon being sworn in at the Supreme Court of Canada, Bertha Wilson declared herself "a true servant of the law" and expressed her trust that "within the collegial structure of this national Court I can be a faithful steward of the best of our legal heritage." Her appointment marked the confluence of two landmark events: the near simultaneous arrival of the Supreme Court of Canada’s first woman judge and Canada’s newly enacted constitutional rights. Her tenure on the Court, from 1982 to 1990, was a momentous - and a poignant - time in Bertha Wilson’s life. In extra-judicial speeches she processed her doubts, fears, and anxieties about the "awesome responsibility" of decision making, admitting that, for her, each judgment would “always be a lonely decision”.

Keywords: Justice Berta Wilson, Canadian Charter

JEL Classification: K10

Suggested Citation

Cameron, Jamie, Justice in Her Own Right: Bertha Wilson and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (2008). REFLECTIONS ON THE LEGACY OF JUSTICE BERTHA WILSON, pp. 371-405, LexisNexis Canada, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1618322

Jamie Cameron (Contact Author)

York University - Osgoode Hall Law School ( email )

4700 Keele Street
Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3
Canada

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