Post-Human Humanitarian Law: The Law of War in the Age of Robotic Warfare

Harvard Journal of National Security, Vol. 2, 2011

14 Pages Posted: 7 Jun 2010 Last revised: 25 Jul 2011

Vik Kanwar

Southwestern Law School

Date Written: June 3, 2010

Abstract

This Review Essay surveys the recent literature on the tensions between of autonomy and accountability in robotic warfare. Four books, taken together, suggest an original account of fundamental changes taking place in the field of IHL: P.W. Singer’s book Wired for War: the Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century (2009), William H. Boothby’s Weapons and the Law of Armed Conflict (2009), Armin Krishnan’s Killer Robots: Legality and Ethicality of Autonomous Weapons (2009), and Ronald Arkin’s Governing Lethal Behavior in Autonomous Robots (2009). This Review Essay argues that from the point of view of IHL the concern is not the introduction of robots into the battlefield, but the gradual removal of humans. In this way the issue of weapon autonomy marks a paradigmatic shift from the so-called “humanization” of IHL to possible post-human concerns.

Keywords: Unmanned Weapons, Humanitarian Law, Robotic Warfare

Suggested Citation

Kanwar, Vik, Post-Human Humanitarian Law: The Law of War in the Age of Robotic Warfare (June 3, 2010). Harvard Journal of National Security, Vol. 2, 2011. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1619766

Vik Kanwar (Contact Author)

Southwestern Law School ( email )

3050 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90010
United States

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