Building a Green Home Fit for a President

Journal of Real Estate Practice and Education, Forthcoming

28 Pages Posted: 16 Jun 2010 Last revised: 11 Jun 2014

See all articles by Michael Seiler

Michael Seiler

College of William and Mary - Finance

Date Written: June 15, 2010

Abstract

Scheuer and Keoleian (2002) report that in July of 2002, there were only 22 (465) LEED certified (registered) buildings across the United States. By 2005, this number had modestly increased to 300 (2,200) certified (registered) buildings (Schendler and Udall, 2005). However, in April of 2009, there were 2,476 LEED certified buildings and almost 20,000 more awaiting certification. Wiley, Benefield, and Johnson (2010) show that to date, nearly two-thirds of all LEED buildings were built by government and non-profit organizations. Still, the trend towards going green has been established in both the private and public sectors.

This teaching case provides students with an opportunity to learn more about what it means to build “green.” What are the individual components of green building? Which components have reached the point where they are economically viable? How long does it take to recover the cost of a green feature? What are the returns to building green? Are there appraisal issues that arise with green building? These and many more questions will be answered in this case.

Suggested Citation

Seiler, Michael, Building a Green Home Fit for a President (June 15, 2010). Journal of Real Estate Practice and Education, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1625351 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1625351

Michael Seiler (Contact Author)

College of William and Mary - Finance ( email )

VA
United States

HOME PAGE: http://mason.wm.edu/faculty/directory/seiler_m.php

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