The Havasupai Indian Tribe Case - Lessons for Research Involving Stored Biologic Samples

Posted: 17 Jun 2010 Last revised: 3 Nov 2013

See all articles by Michelle M. Mello

Michelle M. Mello

Stanford Law School; Department of Medicine

Leslie E. Wolf

Georgia State University College of Law

Date Written: June 10, 2010

Abstract

In April 2010, Arizona State University agreed to pay $700,000 to 41 members of the Havasupai Indian tribe to settle claims that university researchers improperly used tribe members' blood samples in genetic research. The case illuminates the unresolved controversy over what constitutes adequate informed consent for biospecimens collected for research purposes to be stored and used in future, possibly unrelated studies. This article discusses the ethical issues arising in this area and proposes strategies for addressing them.

Keywords: Genetic, Research, Informed Consent, Human Subjects

JEL Classification: I18

Suggested Citation

Mello, Michelle M. and Wolf, Leslie E., The Havasupai Indian Tribe Case - Lessons for Research Involving Stored Biologic Samples (June 10, 2010). New England Journal of Medicine, Forthcoming, Georgia State University College of Law, Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2010-12, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1626200

Michelle M. Mello (Contact Author)

Stanford Law School ( email )

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Stanford, CA 94305-8610
United States
650-725-3894 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://https://law.stanford.edu/directory/michelle-m-mello/

Department of Medicine ( email )

Center for Health Policy / PCOR
Encina Commons
Stanford, CA 94305
United States

HOME PAGE: http://https://profiles.stanford.edu/michelle-mello?tab=bio

Leslie E. Wolf

Georgia State University College of Law ( email )

P.O. Box 4037
Atlanta, GA 30302-4037
United States

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