Male Marital Wage Differentials: Training, Personal Characteristics, and Fixed Effects

21 Pages Posted: 21 Jun 2010

See all articles by William M. Rodgers

William M. Rodgers

College of William and Mary

Leslie S. Stratton

Virginia Commonwealth University - School of Business - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Abstract

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we replicate previous estimates of the marital wage differential for white men, extend the analysis to African American men, then explain the within and between race differentials. We first control for formal job training, then for cognitive skills, parental background, and self-esteem with little effect. By contrast, the white differential but not the black differential disappears in fixed-effects estimation. We reconcile the cross-section/panel differentials by focusing on the distinct identification conditions employed by each technique. Men who never change marital status play a significant role in white cross-sectional estimates.

Suggested Citation

Rodgers, William M. and Stratton, Leslie S., Male Marital Wage Differentials: Training, Personal Characteristics, and Fixed Effects. Economic Inquiry, Vol. 48, Issue 3, pp. 722-742, July 2010, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1627401 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1465-7295.2008.00209.x

William M. Rodgers (Contact Author)

College of William and Mary ( email )

Department of Economics P.O. Box 8795
Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
United States

Leslie S. Stratton

Virginia Commonwealth University - School of Business - Department of Economics ( email )

Box 844000
Richmond, VA 23284-4000
United States
804-828-7141 (Phone)
804-828-1719 (Fax)

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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