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Twenty Years of Postcommunism: The Other Transition

Journal of Democracy, Vol. 21, No. 1, p. 120, January 2010

8 Pages Posted: 20 Jun 2010  

Alina Mungiu-Pippidi

Hertie School of Governance

Date Written: October 20, 2009

Abstract

The paper argues that the history of the postcommunist transition can be rewritten as a renegotiation of a social contract between state and society after Communism. A strong state based on coercion alone is not sustainable, as it is not based on a social contract. Repression is costly, and once the global order of communism broke down, communist regimes, lacking legitimacy, vanished. The communist state’s strength and the extent to which it invaded the private lives of its citizens varied greatly across Eastern Europe; so did the autonomy of the society. This was no simple linear relationship. But the relationship between state and society under communism best explains the divergent paths taken by the former communist countries after 1989.

Keywords: Postcommunism, Coercion, Transition, Social Contract

Suggested Citation

Mungiu-Pippidi, Alina, Twenty Years of Postcommunism: The Other Transition (October 20, 2009). Journal of Democracy, Vol. 21, No. 1, p. 120, January 2010. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1627646

Alina Mungiu-Pippidi (Contact Author)

Hertie School of Governance ( email )

Friedrichstrasse 180, Q110
Berlin, 10117
Germany

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