Urban Policy Effects on Carbon Mitigation

14 Pages Posted: 29 Jun 2010 Last revised: 26 May 2014

See all articles by Matthew E. Kahn

Matthew E. Kahn

University of Southern California; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: June 2010

Abstract

The geographical location of economic activity within the United States has important implications for carbon mitigation. If households clustered in California's cities rather than in more humid southern cities such as Memphis and Houston, then the average household carbon footprint would be lower. Such households would consume less electricity and this power would be generated by cleaner electric utilities. Within metropolitan areas, urban economic theory predicts that households create less greenhouse gas emissions when they live closer to the city center. This study uses three data sets reporting on household driving, public transit use and residential electricity consumption to provide evidence in support of the claim of a negative association between center city living and a household's carbon footprint.

Suggested Citation

Kahn, Matthew E., Urban Policy Effects on Carbon Mitigation (June 2010). NBER Working Paper No. w16131. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1630136

Matthew E. Kahn (Contact Author)

University of Southern California ( email )

2250 Alcazar Street
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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