Lab Labor: What can Labor Economists Learn from the Lab?

111 Pages Posted: 29 Jun 2010

See all articles by Gary Charness

Gary Charness

University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) - Department of Economics

Peter Kuhn

University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Abstract

This paper surveys the contributions of laboratory experiments to labor economics. We begin with a discussion of methodological issues: why (and when) is a lab experiment the best approach; how do laboratory experiments compare to field experiments; and what are the main design issues? We then summarize the substantive contributions of laboratory experiments to our understanding of principal-agent interactions, social preferences, union-firm bargaining, arbitration, gender differentials, discrimination, job search, and labor markets more generally.

Keywords: personnel economics, principal-agent theory, laboratory experiments, labor economics

JEL Classification: C9, J0

Suggested Citation

Charness, Gary and Kuhn, Peter J., Lab Labor: What can Labor Economists Learn from the Lab?. IZA Discussion Paper No. 4941, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1631076

Gary Charness (Contact Author)

University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) - Department of Economics ( email )

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Peter J. Kuhn

University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) - Department of Economics ( email )

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United States
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IZA Institute of Labor Economics

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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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