A Moment in the Times: Law Professors and the Court-Packing Plan

Journal of Legal Education, Vol. 52, Nos. 1 & 2, p. 151, 2002

16 Pages Posted: 10 Jul 2010

See all articles by Kyle Graham

Kyle Graham

Santa Clara University School of Law

Date Written: January 1, 2002

Abstract

When Franklin Roosevelt unveiled his "court-packing" plan, law professors found themselves in an unfamiliar position. For perhaps the first time ever, their professional opinions were being sought by journalists and politicians, for consumption by the general public. In faculty meetings and private correspondence, law professors considered the propriety of taking a stand for or against the President's plan. Ultimately, some professors chose to go public with their support (or opposition); others considered such commentary as a form of advocacy that was incompatible with their job descriptions. This article relates and examines the debate among law professors over both the court-packing proposal and their proper role, if any, in the public sphere.

Keywords: court-packing plan, law professors, law schools, New Deal

Suggested Citation

Graham, Kyle, A Moment in the Times: Law Professors and the Court-Packing Plan (January 1, 2002). Journal of Legal Education, Vol. 52, Nos. 1 & 2, p. 151, 2002. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1636577

Kyle Graham (Contact Author)

Santa Clara University School of Law ( email )

500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA 95053
United States

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