Force, Feminism and the Security Council

20 Pages Posted: 11 Jul 2010

See all articles by Gina Heathcote

Gina Heathcote

University of London - School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) - School of Law

Date Written: 2010

Abstract

This paper argues that the use of the Security Council to develop feminist and women’s activism on women, peace and security splits between resolutions (1325 and 1889) that seek to build women’s agency and resolutions (1820 and 1888) that focus on combating sexual violence against women in conflict and post-conflict environments. The consequence is a limiting of agency, for some women, to situations where women have been sexually violated. Furthermore, a split between first world feminist actors, who gain agency as gender experts, and third world women, who are present as harmed or requiring protection within the resolutions, reflects larger tensions in Western and global feminisms. The paper further argues that the use of military force to challenge widespread or systematic sexual violence requires feminist debate rather than unquestioned inclusion in Security Council resolutions on women, peace and security.

Keywords: Security Council Resolutions on Women, Peace, Security, Feminist Activism, Victims, Agents, International Law on the use of Force

Suggested Citation

Heathcote, Gina, Force, Feminism and the Security Council (2010). SOAS School of Law Research Paper No. 06-2010. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1636887

Gina Heathcote (Contact Author)

University of London - School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) - School of Law ( email )

Thornhaugh Street
Russell Square: College Buildings 541
London, WC1H 0XG
United Kingdom

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