The Role of Specific Subjects in Education Production Functions: Evidence from Morning Classes in Chicago Public High Schools

38 Pages Posted: 12 Jul 2010

See all articles by Kalena E. Cortes

Kalena E. Cortes

Texas A&M University - George Bush School of Government and Public Service; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Jesse Bricker

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

Chris Rohlfs

Syracuse University

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Abstract

Absences in Chicago Public High Schools are 3-7 days per year higher in first period than at other times of the day. This study exploits this empirical regularity and the essentially random variation between students in the ordering of classes over the day to measure how the returns to classroom learning vary by course subject, and how much attendance in one class spills over into learning in other subjects. We find that having a class in first period reduces grades in that course and has little effect on long-term grades or grades in related subjects. We also find moderately-sized negative effects of having a class in first period on test scores in that subject and in related subjects, particularly for math classes.

Keywords: education production, subject-specific, math, English, morning classes, first period, course schedule, quasi-experimental, attendance, absenteeism, Chicago, high school

JEL Classification: I20, I21, J13

Suggested Citation

Cortes, Kalena E. and Bricker, Jesse and Rohlfs, Chris, The Role of Specific Subjects in Education Production Functions: Evidence from Morning Classes in Chicago Public High Schools. IZA Discussion Paper No. 5031, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1638466

Kalena E. Cortes (Contact Author)

Texas A&M University - George Bush School of Government and Public Service ( email )

TAMU 4220
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College Station, TX 77843
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IZA Institute of Labor Economics

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Jesse Bricker

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System ( email )

20th Street and Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20551
United States

Chris Rohlfs

Syracuse University ( email )

Center for Policy Resarch
426 Eggers Hall
Syracuse, NY 13244
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www-cpr.maxwell.syr.edu/

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