Patriots under Pressure: The Influence of Social Norms on American Muslim Patriotism

Posted: 19 Jul 2010 Last revised: 28 Sep 2016

See all articles by Elizabeth Suhay

Elizabeth Suhay

American University; American University - School of Public Affairs

Brian Calfano

Missouri State University – Department of Political Science

Ryan Dawe

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: 2010

Abstract

Recent events have drawn attention to Muslim Americans, in particular whether Islam is compatible with American values. Muslim Americans’ fidelity to the U.S. in particular has been called into question. Drawing on a national survey-experiment of Muslim Americans, we explore the impact of social norms on Muslim Americans’ patriotism. We examine the impact of social norms of the “narrow” in-group as well as of mainstream American society. The evidence suggests participants became more patriotic and supportive of government in response to patriotic norms among both Muslim Americans and Americans in general. However, participants did not become less patriotic in response to norms suggestive of widespread alienation. Furthermore, participants who were registered to vote were most responsive to patriotic social norms among Americans in general, suggesting that political incorporation encourages acculturation. These findings suggest that Muslim Americans do not identify as Muslims, then Americans, but instead as Muslims and Americans.

Keywords: Muslim Americans, patriotism, social norms, socialization, identity, religion

Suggested Citation

Suhay, Elizabeth and Calfano, Brian and Dawe, Ryan, Patriots under Pressure: The Influence of Social Norms on American Muslim Patriotism (2010). APSA 2010 Annual Meeting Paper, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1643632

Elizabeth Suhay (Contact Author)

American University ( email )

4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20016
United States

American University - School of Public Affairs ( email )

Washington, DC 20016
United States

Brian Calfano

Missouri State University – Department of Political Science ( email )

901 South National Avenue
Springfield, MO 65897
United States

Ryan Dawe

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

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