Innovation and Insufficient Evidence: The Case for a WTO Agreement on Health Technology Safety and Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation

INCENTIVES FOR GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH: PATENT LAW AND ACCESS TO ESSENTIAL MEDICINES, Thomas Pogge, Matthew Rimmer, Kim Rubenstein, eds., Cambridge University Press, 2010

ANU College of Law Research Paper No. 10-54

33 Pages Posted: 4 Aug 2010

Date Written: 2010

Abstract

Health technology (particularly including pharmaceuticals and medical devices) constitutes an increasingly important item of international trade regulated by rules developed in large part by the World Trade Organisation (“WTO”). Affordable access to such technologies long will remain a critical factor in national responses to infectious disease pandemics, as well as the prevention of morbidity and mortality associated with disease, war and natural disaster. For many people such equitable access shall continue to be a basic precondition to health. All nations have developed regulatory processes for scientifically assessing the public health impacts of such health technologiesm – mostly in relation to safety issues, but often concerning their cost-effectiveness (that is, their objectively demonstrated therapeutic significance to a community).

Suggested Citation

Faunce, Thomas Alured, Innovation and Insufficient Evidence: The Case for a WTO Agreement on Health Technology Safety and Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation (2010). INCENTIVES FOR GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH: PATENT LAW AND ACCESS TO ESSENTIAL MEDICINES, Thomas Pogge, Matthew Rimmer, Kim Rubenstein, eds., Cambridge University Press, 2010 ; ANU College of Law Research Paper No. 10-54. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1652517

Thomas Alured Faunce (Contact Author)

Australian National University ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia
61 2 61253563 (Phone)

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