Reconsecrating the Temple of Justice: Invocations of Civilization and Humanity in the Nuremberg Justice Case

Canadian Journal of Law and Society, Vol. 24, pp. 181-201, 2009

22 Pages Posted: 22 Aug 2010 Last revised: 8 Apr 2013

See all articles by Christiane Wilke

Christiane Wilke

Carleton University - Department of Law and Legal Studies

Date Written: December 1, 2009

Abstract

Die deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie unter:http://ssrn.com/abstract=2241222

The Nuremberg Trials provide the foundation for contemporary international criminal law. Yet these trials are rarely explored in their broader ideational and social context. This article examines the context and role of the concept of “civilization” as used in U.S. v Altstoetter, the 1947 trial of Nazi judges and judicial administrators at Nuremberg. I place the reference to civilization in Altstoetter within a tradition of international law that understood law and civilization as co-constitutive. The Altstoetter Court conceptualized Germany as an essentially civilized country that lapsed into barbaric and therefore lawless violence. This account helped the Court to establish the blameworthiness of the defendants’ conduct, blame the Nazi violence on lawlessness, and establish its own authority.

Keywords: Nuremberg Trials, Altstoetter, International Criminal Law, Postcolonial, Civilization

Suggested Citation

Wilke, Christiane, Reconsecrating the Temple of Justice: Invocations of Civilization and Humanity in the Nuremberg Justice Case (December 1, 2009). Canadian Journal of Law and Society, Vol. 24, pp. 181-201, 2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1663024

Christiane Wilke (Contact Author)

Carleton University - Department of Law and Legal Studies ( email )

Department of Law, C 473 Loeb
1125 Colonel By Drive
Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6
Canada

HOME PAGE: http://www2.carleton.ca/law/about/wilke.php

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