The Right to Privacy: An Emerging Right in Chinese Law

Statute Law Review, Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 208-214,1997

7 Pages Posted: 26 Aug 2010

See all articles by Guobin Zhu

Guobin Zhu

School of Law, City University of Hong Kong

Date Written: August 25, 1997

Abstract

If the Warren-Brandeis article is taken as a landmark in the evolution of the right of privacy, it might be argued, with some justification, that the right emerged almost a century later in China than in the West. The first consideration in China of the protection of privacy was a judicial interpretation by the Supreme People's Court in 1988.2 A scholar observed that between 1985 and 1987, there was not a single article on the right of privacy published in the People's Republic.* This started to change following two series of lawsuits, in 1988 and 1992, in which journalists were the principal actors. This article examines (i) the academic Chinese analysis of the concept of, and the right to, privacy, and (ii) the scope of the legislative protection of the privacy in China.

Suggested Citation

Zhu, Guobin, The Right to Privacy: An Emerging Right in Chinese Law (August 25, 1997). Statute Law Review, Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 208-214,1997, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1664935

Guobin Zhu (Contact Author)

School of Law, City University of Hong Kong ( email )

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Hong Kong
(852)34427288 (Phone)

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