Forceful Phantom Firsts: Framing Experiences as Firsts Amplifies Their Influence on Judgment

LeBoeuf, Robyn A., Williams, Elanor F., & Brenner, Lyle A. (2014). Forceful phantom firsts: Framing experiences as firsts amplifies their influence on judgment. Journal of Marketing Research, 51 (4), 420-432.

48 Pages Posted: 1 Sep 2010 Last revised: 8 Aug 2014

See all articles by Robyn A. LeBoeuf

Robyn A. LeBoeuf

Washington University in St. Louis

Elanor F. Williams

University of Florida

Lyle Brenner

University of Florida - Department of Marketing

Date Written: August 15, 2010

Abstract

First experiences are highly influential. Here, the authors show that non-first experiences can be made to seem like firsts and consequently to have a disproportionate influence on judgment. In six experiments, one piece of a series of information was framed to appear to have “first” status: for example, a weather report that appeared at the end of a sequence of weather reports happened to correspond to the first day of a vacation, and a customer review that appeared at the end of a sequence of hotel reviews happened to be the new year’s first review. Such information had greater influence on subsequent judgments (e.g., of the next day’s weather or of the hotel’s quality) than did identical information not framed as a first. This effect seems to arise largely because “phantom first” pieces of information receive greater weight than, but not necessarily more attention than, other pieces of information.

Keywords: framing, primacy effects, consumer judgment, behavioral decision theory, impression formation

Suggested Citation

LeBoeuf, Robyn A. and Williams, Elanor F. and Brenner, Lyle, Forceful Phantom Firsts: Framing Experiences as Firsts Amplifies Their Influence on Judgment (August 15, 2010). LeBoeuf, Robyn A., Williams, Elanor F., & Brenner, Lyle A. (2014). Forceful phantom firsts: Framing experiences as firsts amplifies their influence on judgment. Journal of Marketing Research, 51 (4), 420-432., Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1669468 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1669468

Robyn A. LeBoeuf (Contact Author)

Washington University in St. Louis ( email )

One Brookings Drive
Campus Box 1133
St. Louis, MO 63130-4899
United States

Elanor F. Williams

University of Florida ( email )

PO Box 117165, 201 Stuzin Hall
Gainesville, FL 32610-0496
United States

Lyle Brenner

University of Florida - Department of Marketing ( email )

Gainesville, FL 32611
United States

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