Who Moves to Mixed-Income Neighborhoods?

47 Pages Posted: 3 Sep 2010

See all articles by Terra McKinnish

Terra McKinnish

University of Colorado at Boulder - Department of Economics

Kirk White

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: August 1, 2010

Abstract

This paper uses confidential Census data, specifically the 1990 and 2000 Census Long Form data, to study the income dispersion of recent cohorts of migrants to mixed-income neighborhoods. If recent in-migrants to mixed-income neighborhoods exhibit high levels of income heterogeneity, this is consistent with stable mixed-income neighborhoods. If, however, mixed-income neighborhoods are comprised of older homogenous lower-income (higher income) cohorts combined with newer homogenous higher-income (lower-income) cohorts, this is consistent with neighborhood transition. Our results indicate that neighborhoods with high levels of income dispersion do in fact attract a much more heterogeneous set of in-migrants, particularly from the tails of the income distribution, but that income heterogeneity does tend to erode over time. Our results also suggest that the residents of mixed-income neighborhoods may be less heterogeneous with respect to lifetime income.

Suggested Citation

McKinnish, Terra and White, Kirk, Who Moves to Mixed-Income Neighborhoods? (August 1, 2010). US Census Bureau Center for Economic Studies Paper No. CES-WP-10-18. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1670001 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1670001

Terra McKinnish

University of Colorado at Boulder - Department of Economics ( email )

Campus Box 256
Boulder, CO 80309-0256
United States

Kirk White (Contact Author)

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) ( email )

1301 New York Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20250
United States

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