Forensic Science Evidence and Judicial Bias in Criminal Cases

The Judges’ Journal, American Bar Association, Vol. 49, No. 3, p. 18, Summer 2010

7 Pages Posted: 16 Sep 2010

See all articles by Donald E. Shelton

Donald E. Shelton

Criminology and Criminal Justice Program

Date Written: September 14, 2010

Abstract

Although DNA exonerations and the NAS report have raised serious questions about the validity of many traditional non-DNA forms of forensic science evidence, criminal court judges continue to admit virtually all prosecution-proferred expert testimony. It is is suggested that this is the result of a systemic pro-prosecution bias by judges that is reflected in admissibility decisions. These “attitudinal blinders” are especially prevalent in state criminal trial and appellate courts.

Keywords: forensic science, evidence, judicial bias, judges, Daubert

Suggested Citation

Shelton, Donald E., Forensic Science Evidence and Judicial Bias in Criminal Cases (September 14, 2010). The Judges’ Journal, American Bar Association, Vol. 49, No. 3, p. 18, Summer 2010. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1677182

Donald E. Shelton (Contact Author)

Criminology and Criminal Justice Program ( email )

Dearborn, MI 48128
United States

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