High Performance Computing Instrumentation and Research Productivity in U.S. Universities

Journal of Information Technology Impact, Vol. 10, No. 2, pp. 87-98, 2010

12 Pages Posted: 19 Sep 2010 Last revised: 1 May 2013

See all articles by Amy Apon

Amy Apon

University of Arkansas

Stanley Ahalt

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill

Vijay Dantuluri

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill

Constantin Gurdgiev

Trinity College, Dublin; Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS)

Moez Limayem

University of Arkansas

Linh Ngo

University of Arkansas

Michael Stealey

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill

Date Written: September 19, 2010

Abstract

This paper studies the relationship between investments in High-Performance Computing (HPC) instrumentation and research competitiveness. Measures of institutional HPC investment are computed from data that is readily available from the Top 500 list, a list that has been published twice a year since 1993 that lists the fastest 500 computers in the world at that time. Institutions that are studied include US doctoral-granting institutions that fall into the very high or high research rankings according to the Carnegie Foundation classifications and additional institutions that have had entries in the Top 500 list. Research competitiveness is derived from federal funding data, compilations of scholarly publications, and institutional rankings. Correlation and Two Stage Least Square regression is used to analyze the research-related returns to investment in HPC. Two models are examined and give results that are both economically and statistically significant. Appearance on the Top 500 list is associated with a contemporaneous increase in NSF funding levels as well as a contemporaneous increase in the number of publications. The rate of depreciation in returns to HPC is rapid. The conclusion is that consistent investments in HPC at even modest levels are strongly correlated to research competitiveness.

Keywords: High Performance Computing, Research Competitiveness, US Doctoral-Granting Institutions, Investment

JEL Classification: E22, E62, G31, L63, L86, O31, O38

Suggested Citation

Apon, Amy and Ahalt, Stanley and Dantuluri, Vijay and Gurdgiev, Constantin and Limayem, Moez and Ngo, Linh and Stealey, Michael, High Performance Computing Instrumentation and Research Productivity in U.S. Universities (September 19, 2010). Journal of Information Technology Impact, Vol. 10, No. 2, pp. 87-98, 2010. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1679248

Amy Apon (Contact Author)

University of Arkansas ( email )

Fayetteville, AR 72701
United States

Stanley Ahalt

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill ( email )

102 Ridge Road
Chapel Hill, NC NC 27514
United States

Vijay Dantuluri

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill ( email )

102 Ridge Road
Chapel Hill, NC NC 27514
United States

Constantin Gurdgiev

Trinity College, Dublin ( email )

Trinity College
Dublin 2

Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) ( email )

460 Pierce St
Monterey, CA 93940
United States

Moez Limayem

University of Arkansas ( email )

Fayetteville, AR 72701
United States

Linh Ngo

University of Arkansas ( email )

Fayetteville, AR 72701
United States

Michael Stealey

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill ( email )

102 Ridge Road
Chapel Hill, NC NC 27514
United States

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