Trust and Confidence in the Police: A Conceptual Review

15 Pages Posted: 30 Sep 2010

See all articles by Ben Bradford

Ben Bradford

University College London - Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science

Jonathan Jackson

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Methodology

Date Written: September 29, 2010

Abstract

In Britain, public confidence in policing has become a short-hand for trust, legitimacy and consent. As such, the phrase tends to wrap up a set of inter-connected yet empirically and conceptually distinct notions. Yet it is important to unpack these distinct, albeit connected, ideas. At the very least we should differentiate between trust and confidence on the one hand, and legitimacy, compliance, cooperation and consent on the other hand. In this article we: (a) introduce the concept of trust and confidence in the police; (b) document historical trends in trust and confidence; and (c) outline the factors thought to influence public confidence. We aim throughout to highlight key ideas, studies and debates.

Suggested Citation

Bradford, Ben and Jackson, Jonathan, Trust and Confidence in the Police: A Conceptual Review (September 29, 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1684508 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1684508

Ben Bradford (Contact Author)

University College London - Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science ( email )

35 Tavistock Square
London, WC1H 9EZ
United Kingdom

Jonathan Jackson

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Methodology ( email )

Houghton Street
London, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom
+0044-207-955-7652 (Phone)

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
820
Abstract Views
2,899
rank
28,404
PlumX Metrics