Substantive Due Process after McDonald v. Chicago

Mississippi Law Journal Online, Vol. 80, p. 49, 2010

38 Pages Posted: 9 Oct 2010 Last revised: 21 Feb 2011

See all articles by Christopher R. Green

Christopher R. Green

University of Mississippi - School of Law

Date Written: October 7, 2010

Abstract

Few were terribly surprised when the Supreme Court announced at the end of June that the Fourteenth Amendment requires states and municipalities to respect the same individual right to keep and bear arms independent of militia service that the Court had enforced against the federal government two years before in Heller v. District of Columbia. The case was nonetheless hotly anticipated, less out of uncertainty over whether one of the Heller majority might actually vote against incorporation, but for details of the decision’s scope and rationale. This short essay canvasses what the various opinions in McDonald have to say about the scope of Fourteenth Amendment gun rights, the nature of Fourteenth Amendment fundamentality, constitutional theory, and constitutional meta-theory.

Keywords: McDonald v. Chicago, Substantive Due Process, Fourteenth Amendment Fundamentality, Constitutional Theory, Constitutional Meta-Theory, Washington v. Glucksberg, Lawrence v. Texas, Duncan v. Louisiana, Tradition, Consensus, Implicit in the Concept of Ordered Liberty

Suggested Citation

Green, Christopher R., Substantive Due Process after McDonald v. Chicago (October 7, 2010). Mississippi Law Journal Online, Vol. 80, p. 49, 2010. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1689249

Christopher R. Green (Contact Author)

University of Mississippi - School of Law ( email )

Lamar Law Center
P.O. Box 1848
University, MS 38677
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
559
Abstract Views
946
rank
48,937
PlumX Metrics