The 2010 Midterm Election for the US House of Representatives

11 Pages Posted: 15 Oct 2010

See all articles by Douglas A. Hibbs

Douglas A. Hibbs

University of Gothenburg - Center for Public Sector Research (CEFOS)

Date Written: September 22, 2010

Abstract

The number of House seats won by the president’s party at midterm elections is well explained by three pre-determined or exogenous variables: (1) the number of House seats won by the in-party at the previous on-year election, (2) the vote margin of the in-party’s candidate at the previous presidential election, and (3) the average growth rate of per capita real disposable personal income during the congressional term. Given the partisan division of House seats following the 2008 on-year election, President Obama’s margin of victory in 2008, and the weak growth of per capita real income during the first 6 quarters of the 111th Congress, the Democrat’s chances of holding on to a House majority by winning at least 218 seats at the 2010 midterm election will depend on real income growth in the 3rd quarter of 2010. The data available at this writing indicate the that Democrats will win 211 seats, a loss of 45 from the 2008 on-year result that will put them in the minority for the 112th Congress.

Suggested Citation

Hibbs, Douglas A., The 2010 Midterm Election for the US House of Representatives (September 22, 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1691690 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1691690

Douglas A. Hibbs (Contact Author)

University of Gothenburg - Center for Public Sector Research (CEFOS) ( email )

Sweden

HOME PAGE: http://www.douglas-hibbs.com/

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
83
Abstract Views
929
rank
406,839
PlumX Metrics