Sexual Orientation and Self-Reported Lying

Review of Economics of the Household, Vol. 1, No. 7, pp. 83-104

22 Pages Posted: 15 Oct 2010

See all articles by Nathan Berg

Nathan Berg

University of Otago, Department of Economics

Donald D. Lien

University of Texas at San Antonio - College of Business - Department of Economics

Date Written: 2009

Abstract

This paper examines empirical links between sexual orientation and self-reported lying using data collected in several waves of Georgia Institute of Technology’s World Wide Web Users Survey. The data include questions about sexual orientation, lying in cyberspace, and a broad range of demographic information. According to the theoretical framework of Gneezy (Am Econ Rev 95: 384–395, 2005) on the economics of deception, individuals conceal or falsify information when the expected benefit of lying exceeds its costs in terms of psychic disutility. If non-heterosexuals expect to benefit more by falsifying information, then this theory predicts higher rates of lying among non-heterosexuals. The data show that gays and lesbians do indeed report lying more often than heterosexuals, both unconditionally in bivariate correlations and after controlling for demographic and geographic differences. These empirical results are consistent with the conclusion that non-heterosexuals expect higher benefits from concealing personal information because of anti-homosexual discrimination.

Keywords: Deception, Sexual orientation, Gay, Misreporting, Non-response

JEL Classification: D03

Suggested Citation

Berg, Nathan and Lien, Donald, Sexual Orientation and Self-Reported Lying (2009). Review of Economics of the Household, Vol. 1, No. 7, pp. 83-104. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1691927

Nathan Berg (Contact Author)

University of Otago, Department of Economics ( email )

P.O. Box 56
Dunedin, Otago 9016
New Zealand

Donald Lien

University of Texas at San Antonio - College of Business - Department of Economics ( email )

6900 North Loop 1604 West
San Antonio, TX 78249
United States
210-458-4313 (Phone)
210-458-4308 (Fax)

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
17
Abstract Views
362
PlumX Metrics