Ambush Marketing and the Right of Association: Clamping Down on Referenced to that Big Event with All the Athletes in a Couple of Years

Posted: 21 Oct 2010

See all articles by Teresa Scassa

Teresa Scassa

University of Ottawa - Common Law Section

Date Written: August 26, 2010

Abstract

Ambush marketing activities – such as advertisements that obliquely reference a major event – have frustrated major sport event organizers and sponsors for years. Nevertheless, these activities, so long as they stopped short of trademark infringement or false advertising, have been perfectly legal. In the last decade, major sport event organizers such as the International Olympic Committee and the Fédération Internationale de Football Association have pressured national governments to pass legislation prohibiting ambush marketing as a condition of a successful bid to host an event. Such legislation has already been enacted in the United Kingdom, Canada, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand, and the statutes in these jurisdictions reveal an emerging right of association. In this paper, the author surveys the evolution of this right and its key features. She offers a critique of this right, and argues that the need for it has never been properly established, and that the legislation is overly broad, does not reflect an appropriate balancing of interests, and may infringe upon the freedom of expression.

Keywords: sponsorship, trademarks, freedom of expression, unfair competition

Suggested Citation

Scassa, Teresa, Ambush Marketing and the Right of Association: Clamping Down on Referenced to that Big Event with All the Athletes in a Couple of Years (August 26, 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1694659

Teresa Scassa (Contact Author)

University of Ottawa - Common Law Section ( email )

57 Louis Pasteur Street
Ottawa, K1N 6N5
Canada
6135625800x3872 (Phone)
6135645124 (Fax)

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