Public Discourse in the Russian Blogosphere: Mapping RuNet Politics and Mobilization

47 Pages Posted: 29 Oct 2010  

Bruce Etling

Harvard University - Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society

Karina Alexanyan

Harvard University - Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society

John Kelly

Harvard University - Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society

Robert Faris

Harvard University - Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society

John G. Palfrey Jr.

Harvard Law School

Urs Gasser

Harvard University - Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society

Date Written: October 19, 2010

Abstract

We analyzed Russian blogs to discover networks of discussion around politics and public affairs. Beginning with an initial set of over five million blogs, we used social network analysis to identify a highly active ‘Discussion Core’ of over 11,000. These were clustered according to long term patterns of citations within posts, and the resulting segmentation characterized through both automated and human content analysis. Key findings include: • Unlike their counterparts in the U.S. and elsewhere, Russian bloggers prefer platforms that combine features typical of blogs with features of social network services (SNSs) like Facebook. Russian blogging is dominated by a handful of these "SNS hybrids." • While the larger Russian blogosphere is highly divided according to platform, there is a central Discussion Core that contains the majority of political and public affairs discourse. This core is comprised mainly, though not exclusively, of blogs on the LiveJournal platform. • The Discussion Core features four major groupings: — Politics and Public Affairs (including news-focused discussion, business and finance, social activists, and political movements) — Culture (including literature, cinema, high culture, and popular culture) — Regional (bloggers in Belarus, Ukraine, Armenia, Israel, etc.) — Instrumental (paid blogging and blogging for external incentives) • Political/public affairs bloggers cover a broad spectrum of attitudes and agendas and include many who discuss politics from an independent standpoint, as well as those affiliated with offline political and social movements, including strong ‘Democratic Opposition’ and 'Nationalist' clusters. • The Russian political blogosphere supports more cross-linking debate than others we have studied (including those of the U.S. and Iran), and appears less subject to the formation of self-referential 'echo chambers.' • Pro-government bloggers are not especially prominent and do not constitute their own cluster, but are mostly located in a part of the network featuring general discussion of Russian public affairs. However, there is a concentration of bloggers affiliated with pro-government youth groups among the Instrumental bloggers. • We find evidence of political and social mobilization, particularly in those clusters affiliated with offline political and social movements. • The online 'news diet' of Russian bloggers is more independent, international, and oppositional than that of Russian Internet users overall, and far more so than that of non-Internet users, who are more reliant upon state-controlled federal TV channels. • Popular political YouTube videos focus on corruption and abuse of power by elites, the government, and the police.

Keywords: social media, internet, blogosphere, blogging

Suggested Citation

Etling, Bruce and Alexanyan, Karina and Kelly, John and Faris, Robert and Palfrey, John G. and Gasser, Urs, Public Discourse in the Russian Blogosphere: Mapping RuNet Politics and Mobilization (October 19, 2010). Berkman Center Research Publication No. 2010-11. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1698344

Bruce Etling

Harvard University - Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society ( email )

Harvard Law School
23 Everett, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Karina Alexanyan

Harvard University - Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society ( email )

Harvard Law School
23 Everett, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

John Kelly

Harvard University - Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society ( email )

Harvard Law School
23 Everett, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Robert Faris

Harvard University - Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society ( email )

Harvard Law School
23 Everett, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

John G. Palfrey Jr. (Contact Author)

Harvard Law School ( email )

1545 Massachusetts Avenue
Areeda Hall 511
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Urs Gasser

Harvard University - Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society ( email )

Harvard Law School
23 Everett, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

HOME PAGE: http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/people/ugasser.html

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