The Japanese International Law 'Revolution': International Human Rights Law and its Impact in Japan

35 Pages Posted: 30 Nov 2010

See all articles by Kenneth L. Port

Kenneth L. Port

Mitchell Hamline School of Law; William Mitchell College of Law

Date Written: 1991

Abstract

Some observers have argued that because of a lack of enforcement powers, international law has relatively little impact on the conduct of nations and, in fact, may not be "law" at all. Others have inquired whether legal norms which underlie international human rights law have any influence on the domestic law of signatory nations. This article argues that international law can profoundly influence the development of the domestic laws of nations regardless of the lack of coercive enforcement powers. This point becomes clear through a consideration of Japan's experience in adopting and internalizing international law norms.

Keywords: international law, foreign law, Japan, human rights, treaties

Suggested Citation

Port, Kenneth L., The Japanese International Law 'Revolution': International Human Rights Law and its Impact in Japan (1991). Stanford Journal of International Law Vol. 28; William Mitchell Legal Studies Research Paper . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1717011

Kenneth L. Port (Contact Author)

Mitchell Hamline School of Law ( email )

875 Summit Ave
St. Paul, MN 55105-3076
United States

HOME PAGE: http://mitchellhamline.edu/biographies/person/kenneth-l-port/

William Mitchell College of Law ( email )

875 Summit Ave
St. Paul, MN 55105-3076
United States

HOME PAGE: http://mitchellhamline.edu/biographies/person/kenneth-l-port/

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