Ingando Solidarity Camps: Reconciliation and Political Indoctrination in Post-Genocide Rwanda

24 Pages Posted: 3 Dec 2010  

Chi Mgbako

Fordham University School of Law

Date Written: 2005

Abstract

This Note, based primarily on interviews with ingando participants, government officials, journalists, and genocide survivors conducted in Rwanda in January 2004, evaluates the merits and limits of government-run ingando solidarity camps as a means of fostering reconciliation in the complicated social landscape of post-genocide Rwanda. Focusing on ingando for ex-combatants, ex-soldiers, students, and released genocidaires, this Note argues that much of the ingando project is focused on the dissemination of pro-RPF ideology, a dangerous undertaking in a country in which political indoctrination and government-controlled information were essential in sparking and sustaining the genocide. Furthermore, a successful reconciliation program must take place in a society that values human rights; therefore, we cannot evaluate ingando in isolation from human rights developments in Rwanda. This Note argues that ingando will fail as a reconciliation mechanism so long as the Rwandan government continues to attack public spheres of independent thought and criticism.

Suggested Citation

Mgbako, Chi, Ingando Solidarity Camps: Reconciliation and Political Indoctrination in Post-Genocide Rwanda (2005). Harvard Human Rights Journal, Vol. 18, p. 201, 2005; Fordham Law Legal Studies Research Paper . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1719138

Chi Mgbako (Contact Author)

Fordham University School of Law ( email )

140 West 62nd Street
New York, NY 10023
United States

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