International and Comparative Indigenous Rights via Videoconferencing

Legal Education Review, Vol. 19, No. 2, p. 238, 2009

Monash University Faculty of Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2010/13

21 Pages Posted: 15 Dec 2010

See all articles by Margaret A. Stephenson

Margaret A. Stephenson

The University of Queensland - T.C. Beirne School of Law

Bradford Morse

University of Waikato

Lindsey Robertson

University of Oklahoma - College of Law

Melissa Castan

Monash University - Faculty of Law

David Yarrow

Monash University - Faculty of Law

Ruth Thompson

University of Saskatchewan - College of Law

Date Written: December 14, 2010

Abstract

The authors are a team of legal academics who deliver an internationally comparative Indigenous rights course to students in Canada, the United States, Aotearoa/New Zealand and Australia simultaneously via videoconferencing technology. The international universities involved include: University of Ottawa, University of Saskatchewan, University of Oklahoma, University of Auckland, Monash University and the University of Queensland. Situated in six sites in different parts of the globe and in various time zones, teaching together demonstrates the commonality of Indigenous issues. The four countries involved in the course share a similar history of British colonisation and a similar legacy of English common law, yet each country has, in relation to its Indigenous peoples, developed differently from that same origin. The course not only explores similarities and differences in the experiences of the four jurisdictions, but also challenges both students and teachers to understand why those differences have occurred. This article introduces and reviews the experience of videoconference teaching in a comparative Indigenous law course. There are two significant aspects to this course on which this article will focus. The first is a review of the dynamics and logistics of teaching and delivering a course by way of videoconferencing to a number of global sites. The second is an analysis of the advantages of an internationally comparative Indigenous law course. The aim of the article is to enable other law teachers to consider the suitability of videoconferencing courses for international and comparative areas of study, and to learn from the authors’ experiences of the benefits and difficulties involved in this teaching mode.

Keywords: indigenous rights, international law, indigenous issues, law course, videoconference

JEL Classification: I2, I20, I21, I29, K10, K19, K33

Suggested Citation

Stephenson, Margaret A. and Morse, Bradford and Robertson, Lindsey and Castan, Melissa and Yarrow, David and Thompson, Ruth, International and Comparative Indigenous Rights via Videoconferencing (December 14, 2010). Legal Education Review, Vol. 19, No. 2, p. 238, 2009; Monash University Faculty of Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2010/13. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1724997

Margaret A. Stephenson

The University of Queensland - T.C. Beirne School of Law ( email )

The University of Queensland
St Lucia
4072 Brisbane, Queensland 4072
Australia

Bradford Morse

University of Waikato ( email )

Te Raupapa
Private Bag 3105
Hamilton, 3240
New Zealand
+6478384169 (Phone)
+6478384171 (Fax)

Lindsey Robertson

University of Oklahoma - College of Law

300 Timberdell Road
Norman, OK 73019
United States

Melissa Castan (Contact Author)

Monash University - Faculty of Law ( email )

Wellington Road
Clayton, Victoria 3800
Australia

David Yarrow

Monash University - Faculty of Law ( email )

Wellington Road
Clayton, Victoria 3800
Australia

Ruth Thompson

University of Saskatchewan - College of Law ( email )

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Canada

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