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Limited Partnership: Business, Government, Civil Society and the Public in the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative

Public Administration and Development, Forthcoming

Posted: 18 Dec 2010  

Susan Ariel Aaronson

George Washington University - Elliott School of International Affairs

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: August 1, 2010

Abstract

In this paper, I assess the EITI a multisectoral partnership designed to help resource rich countries avoid corruption in the management of extractive industry revenues. Some 32 nations have adopted EITI, and the numbers of implementing nations are rapidly increasing. However, I hypothesize that the EITI partnership is not as effective as it could be for three reasons. First, the partners (governments, civil society, and business) have different visions of EITI. Second, some implementing governments have not allowed civil society to participate fully in the process or have not consistently provided civil society with the information they need to hold their governments to account. In this regard it is a limited partnership. Third, in many participating countries, the public and legislators may not be aware of EITI. Thus, although public participation is essential to the success and potential positive spillovers of EITI, the public is essentially a silent partner, limiting the ability of the EITI to succeed as a counterweight to corruption.

Keywords: EITI, extractives, corruption, civil society, anticorruption, access to information

Suggested Citation

Aaronson , Susan Ariel, Limited Partnership: Business, Government, Civil Society and the Public in the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative (August 1, 2010). Public Administration and Development, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1726173

Susan Aaronson (Contact Author)

George Washington University - Elliott School of International Affairs ( email )

1957 E Street
Washington, DC 20052
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.gwu.edu/~elliott/faculty/aaronson.cfm

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