Creating More Jobs, More Quality and a More Efficient Economy

Posted: 26 Dec 2010  

George Ricci

QE Foundation, Inc.

Date Written: December 26, 2010

Abstract

The purpose of this article is offer solutions that will help create more jobs in our country while simultaneously creating more quality services and products that will lead to a more efficient economy for our government and its people.

Although I have written articles and a book about these solutions in the past, I will try to re-emphasize them in a more abbreviated and direct way here to hopefully generate more interest in exploring their uses for all sectors of our economy. The articles were about the “The QE Principle” and “The QE Staffing and Scheduling Methods” primarily focused on health care facilities. The book named the “QE Concepts of Economics and Work Productivity” was an extension of those articles to include a widespread focus on creating more and better jobs and productivity throughout all our government, institutional and private workplaces that would in turn create a more efficient economy.

The most pressing questions that we face today are about how to create more jobs that will in turn create a better economy. Although there are a myriad of economic theories and proposed political actions to create jobs and stimulate our economy, they fail to see and understand the cultural and bureaucratic constraints that are preventing real solutions.

These constraints will not easily be overcome, but if they can, we can create more jobs, more productivity and a more efficient economy. The most difficult constraint is the cultural standard of the five day Monday to Friday work week with holidays and weekends typically set aside as non work days along with different days of the week that are defined as particularly significant. This constraint is followed by the bureaucratic constraints of the forty hour work week and overtime rules. These constraints may have served a purpose in the past when we had fewer people and less needs, but our increasing and complicated national and global demographics call for a re-examination of these constraints if we are to have a better competitive strategy to create more jobs, more productivity and a more efficient economy.

It would take a lengthy book to fully explore the etiology of these constraints and how they prevent real solutions to our current problems so I will simply describe the solutions that I believe will help solve our problems. The first step of the solutions is to assume that there are no cultural constraints to setting work schedules and focus solely on how to organize and schedule workers for maximum efficiency and economic productivity. This step includes the prevention of using tired and exhausted workers that hinder maximum efficiency and economic productivity. The next step is to assume that there are no bureaucratic labor laws or contracts that specify work hours, days and overtime rules while continuing to focus on organizing and scheduling workers for maximum efficiency and economic productivity. This step also includes the prevention of using tired and exhausted workers.

After these two steps, the process of finding solutions to creating more jobs, more quality products and services and a more efficient economy is easier to accomplish. The solution process includes a new kind of framework for work week scheduling that groups workers into teams for work assignments in such a manner that minimizes individual weak areas to maximize team efficiency and productivity. This process includes a new kind of job sharing system that maximizes team synergy where there is less emphasis on individual job performance and accountability and more emphasis on teamwork performance and accountability. With no cultural or bureaucratic constraints, maximum job creation can be designed for a seven day a week system with a variety of hourly shifts that maximize work productivity.

Is there a current framework for such a system? Yes. Will it create more jobs? Yes. Will it create more quality products and services? Yes. Will it make our economy the most efficient and competitive in the world? Yes. Will it completely eliminate the work week along with weekend and holiday traditions? No. Will it completely eliminate the traditional labor laws and contracts? No. Will it completely eliminate the forty hour workweek standard? No. Will it allow for more leisure time off for workers? Yes. Is it perfect? No. Will more research and trial projects make it better? Yes. Will it help solve our current and particular unemployment and economic problems? Yes. Will economists, human resource specialists, labor leaders, politicians, academics and the general public venture to understand and embrace such a framework? That question remains to be answered, but the old truism that “nothing ventured-nothing gained” certainly applies.

Suggested Citation

Ricci, George, Creating More Jobs, More Quality and a More Efficient Economy (December 26, 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1731304

George Ricci (Contact Author)

QE Foundation, Inc. ( email )

501 c 3 Private Operating Foundation
Corporate Office
Boynton Beach, FL
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.qefoundation.org

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