Following in Your Parents Footsteps? Empirical Analysis of Matched Parent-Offspring Test Scores

19 Pages Posted: 10 Jan 2011

See all articles by Sarah Brown

Sarah Brown

University of Sheffield - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Steven McIntosh

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE)

Karl Taylor

University of Sheffield - Department of Economics

Date Written: August 17, 2010

Abstract

In this article, we explore whether an intergenerational relationship exists between the reading and mathematics test scores, taken at age 7, of a cohort of individuals born in 1958 and the equivalent test scores of their offspring measured in 1991. Our results suggest that how the parent performs in reading and mathematics during their childhood is positively related to the corresponding test scores of their offspring as measured at a similar age. The results further suggest that the effect of upbringing is mainly responsible for the intergenerational relationship in literacy, although genetic effects seem more relevant with respect to numeracy.

Keywords: J13, J24

Suggested Citation

Brown, Sarah and McIntosh, Steven and Taylor, Karl B., Following in Your Parents Footsteps? Empirical Analysis of Matched Parent-Offspring Test Scores (August 17, 2010). Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Vol. 73, No. 1, pp. 40-58, 2010. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1736872 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.2010.00604.x

Sarah Brown

University of Sheffield - Department of Economics

9 Mappin Street
Sheffield, S1 4DT
United Kingdom

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Steven McIntosh

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) ( email )

Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE
+44 (0)171 955 7442 (Phone)

Karl B. Taylor

University of Sheffield - Department of Economics ( email )

9 Mappin Street
Sheffield, S1 4DT
United Kingdom

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