Race and Home Ownership from the Civil War to the Present

27 Pages Posted: 10 Jan 2011

See all articles by William J. Collins

William J. Collins

Vanderbilt University - College of Arts and Science - Department of Economics; The Brookings Institution; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Robert A. Margo

Boston University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: January 2011

Abstract

We present estimates of home ownership for African-American and white households from 1870 to 2007. The estimates pertain to a sample of households headed by adult men participating in the labor force but the substantive findings are unchanged if the analysis is extended to all households. Over the entire period African-American households in the sample increased their home ownership rate by 46 percentage points, whereas the rate for white households increased by 20 percentage points. Thus, in the long run, the racial gap declined by 26 percentage points. Remarkably, 25 of the 26 point long-run narrowing occurred between 1870 and 1910. Since 1910, both white and black households have increased their rates of homeownership but the long-run growth in levels has been similar for both groups, and therefore the racial gap measured in percentage points was approximately constant over the past century.

Suggested Citation

Collins, William J. and Margo, Robert A., Race and Home Ownership from the Civil War to the Present (January 2011). NBER Working Paper No. w16665. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1737213

William J. Collins (Contact Author)

Vanderbilt University - College of Arts and Science - Department of Economics ( email )

Box 1819 Station B
Nashville, TN 37235
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615-322-3428 (Phone)

The Brookings Institution

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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Robert A. Margo

Boston University - Department of Economics ( email )

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Boston, MA 02215
United States
617-353-6819 (Phone)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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